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Thursday, 22 August 2019

Egypt in the News on 22 August 2019

This morning in the foreign press: Egypt will be faced with multiple economic and environment challenges — some obvious, others unexpected — if global temperatures continue to rise, Afshin Molavi, senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Institute at Johns Hopkins University, writes in Arab News. Egyptian farmers are already facing the triple threats of declining rainfall, higher temperatures and increasing concentrations of saltwater, all of which are hurting agricultural production. But melting glaciers in the Arctic will also undermine the Suez Canal’s role as a strategic shipping route: ships in Asia heading west may soon be able to shorten their travel time by using new Arctic shipping lanes, instead of the Suez Canal. Meanwhile, tensions with Sudan and Ethiopia are likely to rise as Nile water becomes more scarce and populations increase.

Water-efficient agriculture in Egypt: The government’s “100k greenhouse project” is part of a water conservation strategy that is essential in the face of existing and anticipated shortages, Jean Marie Takouleu writes in Afrik21. The 1,300 greenhouses are expected to produce 184k tonnes of fruit and vegetables per year, using water efficiently and protecting the crops from insects.

Other stories in the international press:

  • Calls to release US PhD student barred from leaving Egypt: The Middle East Studies Association’s Committee on Academic Freedom has urged the lifting of travel restrictions imposed on a University of Washington PhD student, arrested in May 2018 while conducting academic research on the Egyptian judiciary, Inside Higher Ed reports.
  • Judicial reforms: Constitutional changes granting the power to appoint judges to the presidency is attracting criticism, AFP reports.
  • The E.coli outbreak in Hurghada is back in the news in the British press: The Sun and the Scotsman are reminding readers of a health warning issued by the UK government in July about the spread of E.coli in the Red Sea resort town.
  • A burgeoning tourist interest in long-distance Red Sea mountain trails presents a chance toconnect to ancient Egyptian traditions and civilizations, Trade Arabia reports.

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