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Tuesday, 26 July 2022

A court’s call for a televised execution has caught the attention of the foreign press

Leading the conversation in the foreign press this morning: An Egypt court is calling for the House of Representatives to pass legislation that would allow the public broadcast of the execution of the man found guilty of murdering university student Naira Ashraf earlier this summer. The BBC and AFP have picked up on the story, which is getting wide coverage in the domestic press, from Al Masry Al Youm to Masrawy and El Watan.

Broadcasting the execution (or otherwise carrying it out as a public spectacle) would simply be barbarous. Agree or disagree with capital punishment — and we here at Enterprise simply hate it — the notion of broadcasting it is in every circumstance wrong.

Egypt and other MENA countries are suffering the most from the impact of climate change: The effects of climate change have hit the Middle East region hard over the past years, with the looming threat of water scarcity and drought growing bigger each day, the Associated Press writes. Egypt has seen precipitation fall 22% over the past 30 years, according to the World Bank, while rising soil salinity in its Nile Delta is destroying crucial farmland. Hopes are now that the COP27 summit — which we’ll host in Sharm this November — will see developed nations offer climate financing to developing countries to help them adapt to these changes.

Also making headlines:

  • Human rights lawyer Mohamed Ramadan has been released after four years in prison. Ramadan was arrested in 2018 after publicly showing his solidarity with the yellow vest protest movement occurring in France at the time. There’s still no word on whether Alaa Abdel Fattah is slated for pardon or release. (AFP)
  • The beach in North Sinai’s Sheikh Zuwayd is open to residents and vacationers again, eight years after terrorist attacks prompted authorities to close it on security fears. (Al Monitor)
  • A look inside the Alamein Art Festival: Chinese media is looking at the first edition of the festival, which features the works of seven recycling artists. (Xinhua | watch, runtime: 2:03)

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