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Tuesday, 10 April 2018

Court of Urgent Matters shields Uber and Careem from Administrative Court ruling

Court of Urgent Matters shields Uber and Careem from Administrative Court ruling: The Cairo Court of Urgent Matters suspended on Saturday a ruling by the Administrative Court last month that revoked the licenses of ride-hailing apps Uber and Careem, Al Mal reports. This latest ruling, which came after the companies petitioned the Court of Urgent Matters, gives both companies legal breathing room to operate until a final decision from the Highest Administrative Court, judiciary sources tell Reuters. The March ruling, which came following a lawsuit filed by white taxi drivers, had not yet been enforced by either the government or the companies, with the Ismail Cabinet and Careem both announcing they have yet to receive official court notice.

Temporary stop gap until Ride-hailing Apps Act passes: The development comes as the Ismail Cabinet is trying to rush the Ride-hailing Apps Act into law in the House of Representatives, with the bill garnering little support from ride-hailing companies, taxis and even the Council of State.

White taxis vow vengeance: Lawyers for the taxi drivers behind the mess are again suing the companies in the Administrative Court to have the original ruling upheld, Al Shorouk reports. This latest lawsuit, which was filed on Monday, claims that the Court of Urgent Matters has no jurisdiction to rule on the case.

As far as these guys are concerned we’d like to remind our readers of two things: White taxis are planning to release their own ride-hailing app, Professional Taxi, and we have it on good authority that they have been meeting with investors on this. The Ride-hailing Apps Act, which they so vehemently oppose, offers them protection by forcing ride-hailing companies to incorporate them into their fleets. Simply put, they want to have their cake and eat it too.

The story is receiving widespread coverage in the foreign press, with the Associated Press framing this as another battle in the war between big bad Uber and taxis. Engadget is noting that while Saturday’s ruling does give Uber breathing room, the Ride-hailing Apps Act may hurt the company’s ability to operate in Egypt in the long term.

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